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Certified Regenerative by AGW Standards

Certified Regenerative by AGW Standards

 

Certified Regenerative by AGW standards (PDF)

Regenerative Agriculture: A set of planned agricultural practices that ensure the holding is not depleted by agriculture practices, and over time the soil, water, air and biodiversity are improved or maintained to the greatest extent possible.

The Certified Regenerative seal is a hard-earned badge of difference and demonstrates the steward’s commitment to the environment under their stewardship and to their local communities. A key distinction of a Certified Regenerative holding is the use of agricultural practices aimed at increasing soil health to the best extent possible for that system and its location, while also managing the holding in order to mitigate the negative impacts of human and livestock disruption. This includes the positive management of soil, water, air, cropping systems, livestock, biodiversity, wild harvested resources, and human/societal factors. In its essence, Certified Regenerative agriculture is concerned with the regeneration of soil, water and air quality and biodiversity. In achieving this regeneration, community and worker benefits will be achieved. Stewards of holdings in this program will also be distinguished by the development of a high-welfare and comprehensive approach towards the management of animals in their care as evidenced by physical audit and development of detailed plans and records of holding practices. The premise of the Certified Regenerative standards is that animals must be allowed to behave naturally and can play an important role in the nutrient cycle.

Stewards must agree to a minimum of one visit per year from Certified Regenerative staff or agents, with the possibility of additional visits if deemed necessary in order to confirm compliance with the standard during various seasons and to allow observation of plants and animals in different phases of life. Program participation must be renewed annually.

A Regenerative Plan must be designed by the stewards of the holding in conjunction with a qualified expert familiar with regenerative farming systems in the region.  In some cases, the steward and qualified expert may be the same person. Regenerative plans will be reviewed by A Greener World’s Review Panel prior to the plan being agreed. Incremental and measurable improvement is expected and if equilibrium is reached within the soil or system, the steward is expected to maintain it over time. Compliance to the Certified Regenerative standard will also be measured as an annual audit against the criteria listed in the following standards. The Certified Regenerative program is voluntary. The standards do not supersede national government or state legislation.

Certified Regenerative recommends that stewards have the Guide to Understanding Our Standards and Program Definitions documents at hand while reading these standards; these are accessible online and available by request. The standards must be read as a whole for their interpretation.

CERTIFIED REGENERATIVE PRINCIPLES:

Principle 1.0: As each holding has its unique characteristics and individual solutions, regenerative agricultural holdings must be managed by the stewards of the land.

Principle 2.0: Agricultural production can cause disruption to the ecosystem. A Certified Regenerative holding not only minimizes this disruption, but uses it to regenerate key environmental factors, such as soil health, water, biodiversity and air quality.

Principle 3.0: Certified Regenerative agriculture works to maintain, restore and build soil health to the best extent possible for that location and encompasses agricultural practices, planning and re-evaluation in order to deliver success over time.

Principle 4.0: A significant part of water, fish and riparian habitats occur on or around farmland, and many agriculture systems are large consumers of water; thus, Certified Regenerative stewards must play a key role in helping to conserve and restore these habitats.

Principle 5.0: Agricultural carbon sequestration and other management practices can mitigate global warming. A regenerative system should capture, store and cap carbon in the soil. Regenerative stewards must also avoid polluting the air as part of the atmosphere. 

Principle 6.0: Livestock can have an important role to play in a Certified Regenerative holding: ruminants are more efficient at converting forage to protein than humans are, and all livestock produce manure that can be an important source of fertility. Animals must be allowed to behave naturally and to perform natural and instinctive behaviors essential to their health and well-being.

Principle 7.0: Any land use or cropping systems in a Certified Regenerative holding must balance the farmed ecosystem with natural systems. Stewards should apply high standards of conservation management to enhance landscape features, habitats and wild plant and animal species, while linking habitats and employing creative conservation projects.

Principle 8.0: Biodiversity is an essential indicator of a successful Certified Regenerative farming system where wildlife habitats are integral parts of the holding. These include areas such as banks, hedges, ponds, species-rich pastures, wetland areas and scrubland.

Principle 9.0: Human-constructed buildings become part of the landscape and contribute to the environment; they must be included in the Regenerative Plan and managed for resource efficiency.

Principle 10.0: Humans are an integral part of farming an­­d sustainability: Certified Regenerative holdings must be managed in a socially responsible way.  

Principle 11.0: In order for a holding to be regenerative, it must be economically sustainable. Certified Regenerative holdings must have a financial plan that considers the long-term financial stability and viability of the holding and its operation.

Certified Regenerative by AGW Standards

Regenerative Agriculture is a series of agricultural practices that leave the agricultural system in a better state than when they started, or in a state of ecological equilibrium if the maximum living soil health has already been achieved. However, it is important to accept that beyond a core focus on soil health, Regenerative Agriculture incorporates life-promoting practices throughout the ecosystem, including soil, water, air, cropping systems, livestock, biodiversity, wild harvest, and human/societal factors.

Certified Regenerative requires a measurable Regenerative Plan, written by the farmer and/or Qualified Expert and subsequently reviewed by the Review Panel. As every location carries individual characteristics, individual solutions must be tailored for the success of the holding. Beyond the Plan, and certain ownership and operation requirements outlined in Section I (The Regenerative Plan), the holding that strives for certification must also satisfy the best practices and standards in Section II (The Best Practices and Standards).

SECTION I: THE REGENERATIVE PLAN

1 STEWARDSHIP

Principle 1.0: As each holding has its unique characteristics and individual solutions, regenerative agricultural holdings must be managed by the stewards of the land.

1.0.1 The individual or entity seeking Certified Regenerative status for their holding must have management control of the holding for the duration of the Regenerative Plan.

1.0.2 If the holding manages animals for meat, dairy or other agricultural production, the individual or entity seeking Certified Regenerative status must adhere to Certified Regenerative livestock standards.

1.0.3 Certified Regenerative is a ‘whole farm’ program, meaning the Certified Regenerative Standards must be met for all the species which the holding produces for sale or trade. Stewards must not use “Split” or “Dual” Systems; for example, in which some crops are simultaneously farmed in systems that meet Certified Regenerative Standards as well as systems that do not, or systems that include conventional cropping using inputs not allowed by Certified Regenerative Standards, alongside a field of crops that are farmed using regenerative techniques.

1.0.4 Clear traceability is required from the holding to finished labeled product for any Certified Regenerative products.

Note: A holding may be eligible for Certified Regenerative status if it generates no products for sale. An example of this may be historical estates, parks, educational institutions or conservation land.

1.0.5 Holdings must not offset their impacts.

Note: CR Holdings are free to use their data generated though CR planning and certification to participate in outside carbon trading, but AGW does not provide such credits or participate in carbon trading programs.

Note: Holdings may plan and trade output with other Certified Regenerative partners, such as cooperative members.

1.0.6 The certified holding may participate in networks, cooperatives or marketing groups in order to market products as Certified Regenerative as long as each member is audited as meeting all other requirements listed in these standards.

Note: If agricultural products such as milk or eggs are pooled, they may only be represented for sale as Certified Regenerative if all producers are certified as such. Similarly, if agricultural products from several producers are sold under a single brand, the brand may only represent the products as Certified Regenerative if all producers are certified. 

1.0.7 All those engaged on the holding must be competent to carry out the tasks required of them or be trained to carry out the tasks required of them.

Note: This standard applies to contract and temporary workers as well as full-time employees and family members.

1.0.8 The holding must have valid, legal and undisputed land use and tenure rights (including resource use rights, such as water use, but excluding mining). If there are any disputes, A Greener World must be informed.

Note: Exceptions may be given in locations where rights are not available.

1.0.9 The following activities are prohibited:

1.0.9.1 Fracking.

1.0.9.2 Mining.

1.0.9.3 Top soil removal.

1.0.9.4 Destruction of riparian zones.

1.0.9.5 Deforestation.

1.0.9.6 Slash and burn farming.

1.0.9.7 Peat harvesting.

Note: AGW may prohibit other activities as identified on a case-by-case basis. Where the prohibited activity can be demonstrated not to have a negative impact, an application for an individual derogation may be granted.

1.0.10 A complaints record relating to complaints about Certified Regenerative certified livestock or products must be maintained and be available at annual inspection. The record must list both the complaint and the action taken by the farm or business.

2 THE REGENERATIVE PLAN

Principle 2.0: Agricultural production can cause disruption to the ecosystem. A Certified Regenerative holding not only minimizes this disruption, but uses it to regenerate key environmental factors, such as soil health, water, biodiversity and air quality.

2.0.2 The Regenerative Plan of the holding must address all applicable factors to the health or success of the particular site(s) and the integration of their impacts including, but not limited to:

2.0.2.1 Soil.

2.0.2.2 Water.

2.0.2.3 Air.

2.0.2.4 Cropping systems.

2.0.2.5 Livestock.

2.0.2.6 Biodiversity.

2.0.2.7 Wild Harvest.

2.0.2.8 Human/societal factors.

Note: A Greener World can provide an example template document which can be modified to reflect the individual holding.  

2.0.3 The Regenerative Plan must extend for at least five years.

2.0.4 Recommended The Regenerative Plan should cover a period of ten years or longer.

2.0.5 Records must be kept for at least five years or as long as required to prove compliance to the Regenerative Plan.

2.0.6 The Regenerative Plan must be reviewed once a year.

2.0.6.1 The Regenerative Plan must be drafted or updated and submitted before each audit as part of that process.

2.0.7 Recommended The Regenerative Plan should be reviewed regularly throughout the year and as changes to holding management or activities occur.

2.0.8 The Regenerative Plan must be written by a person with knowledge of the holding and regenerative systems in the region.

2.0.9 The Regenerative Plan must cover all aspects of the holding management and assessments of its impacts. The plan must identify:

2.0.9.1 A start point.

2.0.9.2 A goal and milestones to the goal.

2.0.9.3 Management practices.

2.0.9.4 Suitable monitoring methods agreed with the Qualified Expert and detailed within the plan. See Annex A.

Note: Achievement to those milestones will be assessed at each audit. As an example, the plan might identify the lack of organic matter in the soil, and a potential target level of organic matter. The proposed method of increasing the organic matter and the methods of validating the milestones of achieving this goal shall be detailed in the Regenerative Plan.

2.0.10 The person submitting the Regenerative Plan must be involved in and have oversight of its implementation.

2.0.11 For each holding the previous land use background and known management history must be recorded. This record will form part of the baseline for regenerative outcomes.

2.0.12 A map must be included to describe the land use background (for example, from your local governmental GIS or Google Earth), which includes:

2.0.12.1 Streams or watercourses.

2.0.12.2 Wooded areas.

2.0.12.3 Fields and field uses.

2.0.12.4 Areas of special biodiversity for any wild-harvested plant or fungi species and test sites.

2.0.12.5 The number and locations of buildings and residences must be identified and included in this map.

2.0.12.6 Any plans for maintenance or restoration must also be noted.

2.0.12.7 Any historic buildings or sites of archeological importance must be identified on the background Map.

2.0.13 Recommended An explanation of any known historic manipulations to watercourses and known environmentally sensitive areas should be included with map.

2.1 Regenerative Plan Sections

2.1.1 The Regenerative Plan must have at least two sections:

2.1.1.1 Section I- The Regenerative Assessment: An overall plan to analyze risks of activities to the parts of the ecosystem carried out on the holding, which identifies and outlines the targets for management.

2.1.1.2 Section II- The Regenerative Plan: Identifies the methods, timelines and measurable results of the practices used to address the identified risks.

2.1.2 Risk Assessments must be used to identify risks associated to specific activities carried out on the farm. Risk assessments will include risks of activities on the holding including:

2.1.2.1 Soil.

2.1.2.2 Water.

2.1.2.3 Air quality.

2.1.2.4 Fossil fuel usage such as tractor hours.

2.1.2.5 Cropping systems.

2.1.2.6 Livestock.

2.1.2.7 Biodiversity

2.1.2.8 Wild harvest.

2.1.2.9 Human/societal factors.

2.1.3 Where risks are identified, baseline assessments must be carried out. The Regenerative Assessment must detail baseline, target and annual assessments of activities on the holding including:

2.1.3.1 Soil.

2.1.3.2 Water.

2.1.3.3 Air quality.

2.1.3.4 Fossil fuel usage such as tractor hours.

2.1.3.5 Cropping systems.

2.1.3.6 Livestock.

2.1.3.7 Biodiversity

2.1.3.8 Wild harvest.

2.1.3.9 Human/societal factors.

2.1.4 Recommended The plan should also note known off-holding risks, such as upstream water contamination that could find its way to the holding.

2.1.5 Baseline testing or assessment methods, locations and frequency must be agreed with the Qualified Expert and detailed within the plan to demonstrate current conditions or equilibrium, but in any event at every location proposed regenerative activities are going to occur. At a minimum, every holding must track two measures of soil health and biodiversity.

2.1.6 Where specific activity risks are identified, assessment must occur at the time of the activity.

Note: see Annex B for Assessment, Monitoring & Testing Methods.

2.1.7 Regenerative Assessment must include an inventory of the holding equipment, to include all fossil fuel and carbon-burning technologies and other sources of pollution, their emission status,  with plans to improve efficiency overtime.

Note: Efficiency improvements may be achieved by upgrading to lower-emission, environmentally friendly technology, plans to repair rather than renew technology, or plan to reduce fuel use or hours used over time.

Note: In situations where air, water, or land pollution is beyond the steward’s control, please contact A Greener World.

2.1.8 Fossil fuel usage must be tracked, stewards must record machinery hours and / or fuel consumption, and fossil fuels burnt for heating or as an energy source.

2.1.9 If livestock are part of the holding an analysis of the integration of animals with the holding ecosystem must be made and detailed in the Regenerative Assessment to ensure compliance with Section 6.

2.1.10 Any cropping systems that are part of the holding must be detailed in the Regenerative Assessment and reviewed for their impacts on the ecosystem to ensure compliance with Section 7.

2.1.11 Where wild harvesting activities are practiced on the holding, a written assessment must be carried out to ensure the outcome of the wild harvesting will not preclude the natural regeneration of the population.

See Guidance Document on Wild Harvest Population Monitoring.

2.1.12 A list of the habitats and species observed on the holding must be included in the Regenerative Plan.

See Guidance Document on Good Collection Practices.

2.1.13 Any known sensitive flora or fauna species present on the holding must be noted.

See Guidance Document on Biological Monitoring for the steward & reference sensitive and endangered species lists, such as the Convention on International Trade in endangered species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) https://www.cites.org/eng/disc/species.php & The IUCN Red List http://www.iucnredlist.org/. It is important that the person doing the inventory and listing understands biodiversity and can readily identify all the forms of flora on the holding.

2.1.14 A written assessment of the holding’s current and planned construction of infrastructure, new buildings, or renovation of existing buildings, including timescales, must be detailed in the Regenerative Assessment and impacts to the ecosystem assessed.

2.1.15 Recommended If applicable, an assessment of how the construction on the holding impacts or contributes to the local community (can be positive or negative) should be included.

2.1.16 A record of the people that reside on the holding, along with their roles (if any) must be given in the Regenerative Assessment.

2.1.17 The facility must have a general financial plan and overview of the long term financial sustainability goals of the holding.

Note: This does not need to contain actual financial data but general objectives of the holding. For example, this may include increasing or reducing the size of a specific livestock or crop enterprise or starting a new enterprise.

2.1.18 Recommended The financial plan should include long-term goals and succession for the holding, including annual operating budgets.

See Guidance Document on Holistic Financial Planning

2.2 Section II- The Regenerative Plan

2.2.1 Regenerative agriculture requires a whole system approach. The Regenerative Plan must demonstrate how the holding intends to balance its imports and exports for fertility, either as an individual holding or through partnerships and collaborations.

2.2.2 Recommended The Regenerative Plan should identify at what point in the regenerative process a holding will be self-sufficient.

2.2.3 All sites identified for measurement or assessment must be marked clearly on the holding map in a way that makes identification and classification simple and consistent.

2.2.4 Protected sites of threatened or endangered species must be mapped in the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.5 Where risks have been identified, a chart of testing results and assessments must be kept in the Regenerative Plan and compared annually against goals and management strategies.

Note: see Annex C Worksheets Template

2.2.6 Where risks to the soil are identified, management practices must be put in place to mitigate impacts and assessment or testing must be performed as prescribed in the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.7 Recommended The goal of the regenerative program for all on-holding activities is for carbon sequestration to reach equilibrium. Ongoing management practices should maintain that equilibrium and an approved validation program for monitoring carried out.

2.2.8 Where risks from activities on the holding are identified for water quality, management practices must be put in place to mitigate impacts and assessment or testing must be performed as prescribed in the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.9 If risk to water quality is identified, water quality testing must be performed and repeated each successive year until target water quality is achieved.

2.2.10 Action must be taken to mitigate water runoff from roadways, buildings or fields.

Note: Actions could include well-maintained land and building drainage systems, cultivation along contours, provision of temporary ponds and other water holding areas, and providing uncultivated buffer areas in cultivated fields.

2.2.11 Management plans must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan regarding any watercourse or aquatic habitat protection or restoration.

2.2.12 If livestock are present, a pasture management plan must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan, including:

2.2.12.1 Stocking density of livestock on pasture.

2.2.12.2 Types of vegetation, such as species present.

2.2.12.3 Percentage of vegetation cover.

2.2.12.4 Pasture establishment and management techniques.

2.2.12.5 Grazing management techniques.

2.2.13 The goals for the integration of livestock into the farm ecology of the holding must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan. Detailing the connections between animals and plants on the holding (the types and quantities of plants grown or used for livestock), such as appropriate crop waste being used for supplementing animal feed, and in turn animal manure compost being used to fertilize fields can satisfy this requirement.

2.2.14 An Integrated Crop Management (ICM) system must be developed in the Regenerative Plan. As a minimum the plan must consider:

2.2.14.1 Crops grown, including projected outputs.

2.2.14.2 Details of crop rotation/s.

2.2.14.3 Details of projected inputs.

2.2.14.4 Cultivation / tillage techniques.

2.2.14.5 Measures implemented to benefit / increase biodiversity.

2.2.14.6 Nutrient and pH requirements of the crop.

2.2.14.7 Availability of nutrients to the crop in the soil from soil testing.

2.2.14.8 Crop nutrients supplied from organic sources, i.e. Manures produced on the holding.

2.2.14.9 Crop nutrients required / supplied from brought-in organic sources.

2.2.14.10 Crop nutrients required from artificial fertilizers.

2.2.14.11 Manure storage techniques to minimize the loss of nutrients and leaching.

2.2.14.12 Manure, soil improver and fertilizer application techniques to minimize the loss of nutrients and leaching.

2.2.14.13 Details of weeds that are a regular problem on the holding.

2.2.14.14 Where chemicals are used, details of known resistance to herbicides.

2.2.14.15 Details of insects, slugs, etc., that are a regular problem on the holding.

2.2.14.16 Details of crop diseases (including viruses) that are a regular problem on the holding.

2.2.14.17 Where used, details of known resistance to pesticides or fungicides.

2.2.14.18 Details of how crop rotations are used to manage threats from pests, weeds and disease.

2.2.14.19 Details of mechanical or non-chemical techniques used.

2.2.14.20 Where herbicides or pesticides are used, justification for use, including a plan to reduce usage to a point they are no longer required.

2.2.14.21 Details of any products used that are considered a risk in the specific catchment.

2.2.14.22 Details of water course and water source protection measures.

2.2.14.23 Details of machinery / equipment cleaning to reduce the spread of pests, weeds and disease.

2.2.14.24 Details of how the success of crop protection measures are monitored and reviewed.

2.2.14.25 Details of how deep-rooted perennials and native grasses, legumes and/or forbs are used to promote fertility and soil health in crop rotations.

2.2.15 Where holdings exchange inputs and resources with other Certified Regenerative holdings, this must be detailed within the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.16 Holdings must plan to cease being net importers of inputs showing incremental decreases over time. The holding must plan either as a whole farm system or by trading partnerships.

2.2.17 Regenerative Plans must define measures to increase biodiversity on the holding, identifying targets and timescales by which this will be achieved.

2.2.18 A plan for the protection or population improvement must be made for any known sensitive flora or fauna species present on the holding, detailing monitoring techniques and frequency.

2.2.19 Where invasive species populations are identified in wild areas on a holding, a plan must be developed for their control or eradication, detailing monitoring techniques and frequency.

2.2.20 A recycling program and plan to reduce waste must be included for holding activities and domestic residencies, detaining current quantities produced, targets and timescales must be included in the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.21 The plans for the human/social factor relating to each holding must be included in the Regenerative Plan.

2.2.22 Recommended The plan should include the number of workers, goals for increasing or decreasing employment, goals and strategies for gains or benefits of workers and strategy for the holding’s relationship to the community.

Note: see Annex C Worksheets Template

2.2.23 The use of prohibited inputs is not allowed: See Annex D & E.

2.2.24 The use of restricted materials for Certified Regenerative agricultural production may only be used if planned and targeted as part of the approved Regenerative Plan. Use must be phased out over time as agreed with A Greener World:  See Annex D & E.

2.2.25 Recommended Holdings should engage in Financial Planning to ensure the sustainability and succession of the holding.

SECTION II: THE BEST PRACTICES AND STANDARDS

3 SOIL

Principle 3.0: Certified Regenerative agriculture works to maintain, restore and build soil health to the best extent possible for that location and encompasses agricultural practices, planning and re-evaluation in order to deliver success over time.

3.0.1 Soil must be managed to minimize soil erosion.

3.0.2 Soil must be managed in order to optimize Soil Structure, biological activity, and fertility.

3.0.3 Plant and animal waste must be managed in order to improve soil organic matter content in a manner that does not contribute to contamination of crops, soil, or water by:

3.0.3.1 Plant nutrients.

3.0.3.2 Pathogenic organisms.

3.0.3.3 Heavy metals.

3.0.3.4 Residues of prohibited substances.

Note: See Guidance Document on Simple Monitoring Techniques for stewards.

3.0.4 Recommended Management of soils to increase and maintain organic carbon content must be monitored over time as a resource, and to promote the delivery of wider ecosystem services.

Note: Examples of wider ecosystem services that organic carbon content affects includes carbon sequestration, water retention, and the indirect effects on soil biology (below ground biodiversity and nutrient cycling, and part of the concept of soil health).

3.0.5 Recommended Plowing of soil should be avoided.

3.0.6 If plowing is deemed necessary it must be justified within the Regenerative Plan.

3.0.7 Tillage practices must minimize soil disturbance, with the objective over time to reduce the depth and frequency of cultivation and soil disturbance.

Note: AGW defines cultivations as the following categories:

Deep inversion – greather than or equal to 10″ or 25 cm depth
Double-layer plowing – inversion of topsoil to a depth of 6″ or 15cm / loosening topsoil to a depth of 12″ or 30 cm
Shallow inversion – less than 10″ or 10-25 cm depth
Non-inversion – 4″ to 10″ or 10-25 cm depth
Min-till – less than 4″ or 10cm depth
No-till

3.0.8 Activities that cause broad-scale soil compaction are prohibited.

Note: A derogation may be given if part of a prescribed practice to restore soil structure.

3.0.9 Recommended No-tillage practices should be employed.

3.0.10 Cultivation techniques may include inversion for weed control. This use must be outlined in the Regenerative Plan.

3.0.11 The use of fill dirt must be minimized.

3.0.12 Land used for production must not be left bare for more than 4 weeks, except where justified in the Regenerative Plan.

3.0.13 Cover crops or green manures must be used to prevent erosion.

3.0.14 Recommended Leguminous cover crops should be used to increase productivity by providing an organic source of nitrogen.

3.0.15 In the production and application of compost to soils, anaerobic decomposition must be avoided.

3.0.16 The use of sewage sludge is prohibited.

Note: Content from composting toilets must be addressed in the plan.

3.0.17 Where manure is composted, it must be done in a manner as to eliminate risk of pathogens.

3.0.18 Crop residues and manure must be added back to the soil when available.

Note: Where straw / crop residues are removed for the use for animal bedding or part of a nutrient exchange program with a livestock farmer, it is acceptable to remove crop residues from the field. 

3.0.19 Pasture land must be managed to regenerate and optimize soil health and fertility, according to the Regenerative Plan.

3.0.20 Species-rich permanent pasture must not be plowed.

3.0.21 The holding must maintain or increase the area of permanent pasture with which it enters certification.

3.0.22 Deep-rooting perennials, native grasses, legumes and/or forbs must be used to improve soil health, the water cycle and biodiversity.

3.0.23 Unless prescribed in the Regenerative Plan, overgrazing is prohibited. Following grazing, pasture must have planned periods of rest and recovery.

3.0.24 Grazing practices that promote soil fertility must be employed. These practices must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan.

3.0.25 Non-routine, non-chemical soil sterilization is permitted, such as soil solarization.  Reasons for use and timings must be included in the Regenerative Plan.

4 WATER

Principle 4.0: A significant part of water, fish and riparian habitats occur on or around farmland, and many agriculture systems are large consumers of water; thus, Certified Regenerative stewards must play a key role in helping to conserve and restore these habitats.

4.0.1 The use of blue water for agricultural production must be sustainable.

4.0.2 The use of blue water must reflect local, state or regional regulatory oversight.

4.0.3 The use of blue water use must be detailed within the Regenerative Plan, as a minimum:

4.0.3.1 The state or condition of the aquifer or water source.

4.0.3.2 Quantities used per year.

4.0.3.3 Measures to move away from regular blue water use for irrigation, including timescales.

4.0.4 Where systems are used that recycle blue water, systems must be in place to clean the water.

4.0.5 A buffer/exclusion zone must be provided alongside or around watercourses or reservoirs to protect biodiversity and prevent soil erosion.

Note: The buffer strip can be natural or productive vegetation, provided it performs the protective function. An irrigation ditch is considered a watercourse.

4.0.5.1 Riparian areas and buffers must be maintained in good condition.

4.0.5.2 A riparian area can be considered a buffer strip.

4.0.5.3 The buffer strip must be optimized to remove nutrients, pesticides and sedimentation from erosion. The composition, size and location will be determined in the Regenerative Plan.

4.0.6 Recommended Canopy cover in riparian areas should be comparable to local healthy ecological reference conditions.

4.0.7 Unless in the approved Regenerative Plan, physical alterations of any natural watercourse, water body, bank-side habitat, or wetland are prohibited, except for routine clearing of fallen debris.

Note: Exemptions may be granted for activities such as applying induced meandering, stream restoration or installing local-scale energy generation. These activities must be detailed within the Regenerative Plan.  

4.0.8 In cases where local wildlife or natural conditions will induce damming, management actions must be noted in the Regenerative Plan.

4.0.9 Where risk was assessed in the Regenerative Plan, management practices must be employed to prevent water pollutants from entering the water catchment.

4.0.10 The discharging of untreated wastewater into watercourses is prohibited.

4.0.11 Where risks from activities on the holding are identified for water quality, management practices must be put in place to mitigate impacts and assessment or testing must be performed as prescribed in the Regenerative Plan.

Note: see Annex B for Assessment, Monitoring & Testing Methods.

4.0.12 In areas of high risk, soil, ground and surface water assessment or testing must be performed. Assessment frequency must be justified in the Regenerative Plan.

4.0.13 Planned activities must not negatively impact habitats associated with watercourses or water bodies.

4.0.14 If watercourses are accessed by livestock, the access must be controlled.

4.0.15 Recommended The activities of the livestock should avoid contamination.

4.0.16 Stream or river crossings must not restrict flow up or downstream.

4.0.16.1 New or planned stream crossings must not impact the flow or quality of the water up or downstream.

4.0.16.2 Consideration must be given to modifying the construction of existing stream or river crossings that impact water flow.

4.0.16.3 Restriction may be permitted as part of the plan to restore previously altered watercourses.

4.0.16.4 The number of stream crossings should be minimized.

4.0.16.5 Any new stream crossings must be designed to avoid impacts to in-stream habitat, allow fish passage, and at least accommodate flood levels during 25-year storm events.

4.0.17 Recommended Human-made in-stream barriers to fish and wildlife should be removed to allow restoration of in-stream habitats.

4.0.18 New obstructions must not be built.

Note: If a new obstruction supports the Regenerative Plan, a derogation may be given.

4.0.18.1 Where previous alteration(s) have been made to watercourses, consideration must be given to restoring the condition prior to the alteration.

4.0.19 Strategies for water conservation must be introduced to minimize the need for irrigation.

Note: These strategies include development of soil organic matter, mulching, efficient irrigation delivery systems, alternative pumping methods, routine irrigation system maintenance, and monitoring soil moisture.

4.0.20 Water used for irrigation must not impact biodiversity associated with watercourses.

4.0.21 Water conservation strategies must be employed in any new residence or building in the Certified Regenerative holding.

4.0.22 Recommended Water conservation strategies should be used in current residences or buildings in the Certified Regenerative holding.

4.0.23 Recommended Irrigation should not rely on streams or rivers.

5 Air

Principle 5.0: Agricultural carbon sequestration and other management practices can mitigate global warming. A regenerative system should capture, store and cap carbon in the soil. Regenerative stewards must also avoid polluting the air as part of the atmosphere. 

5.0.1 Production practices on the certified holding must minimize risk of air pollution.

5.0.2 Where risks from activities on the holding are identified for air quality, management practices must be put in place to mitigate impacts and assessment or testing must be performed as prescribed in the Regenerative Plan.

Note: see Annex B for Assessment, Monitoring & Testing Methods.

5.0.3 Best burning practices must be employed as identified in the Regenerative Plan.

Note: for the U.S.A., see EPA’s Burn Wise program for Best Burning Practices https://www.epa.gov/burnwise; for the UK, see defra.gov.uk.

5.0.4 Burning of household or agricultural waste, with the exception of prescribed burning, is prohibited. Household and agricultural waste includes:

5.0.4.1 Household waste / trash.

5.0.4.2 Coated, painted, and pressure-treated wood.

5.0.4.3 Ocean driftwood, plywood, particle board, or any wood with glue in it.

5.0.4.4 Wet, rotted, diseased, or moldy wood.

5.0.4.5 Plastic, asbestos, rubbish, manure and animal remains.

5.0.5 Prescribed burning may be carried out as identified in the Regenerative Plan.

5.0.5.1 Prescribed burning must be planned and have clear objectives as identified in the Regenerative Plan.

5.0.5.2 Prescribed burning must be carried out in consultation with local, state or federal authorities, and should not be a regular practice of holding management.

5.0.6 Wood burnt as an energy source or heating must be seasoned for a minimum of six months, untreated and from sustainable sources

5.0.7 The burning of woody debris or crop residues must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan.

5.0.8 All vehicles owned or operated by the holding must be operated and maintained in such a way that they do not cause liquid pollution (from vehicle fluids).

5.0.9 Recommended Holding vehicles or equipment should be transitioned over time to lower-emission engines on holdings, or a plan for improvement repairs rather than renewing should be followed. Ideally, alternative fuel vehicles should be used.

5.0.10 Recommended Diesel exhaust emissions should be reduced on holdings by permanently removing in-use mobile agricultural equipment and replacing with new “like” equipment powered with the latest tier-emissions certified diesel engines.

5.0.11 Recommended Irrigation engine emissions should be reduced on holdings by permanently removing in-use irrigation engines and replacing with new tier-emissions certified diesel engines or new electric motors.

5.0.12 Recommended The timescale to achieve standards 5.0.9, 5.0.10, 5.0.11 should be detailed in the Regenerative Plan.

5.0.13  Recommended Waste-stream biofuels (such as biodiesel) are recommended.

5.0.14 Areas and activities on the holding at risk of producing significant fugitive dust or particulate matter 10 (PM 10) must be managed to lessen this impact.

Note: management techniques may include the installation of signage to limit vehicle speed limit to 15 MPH, or the use of speed control devices, such as speed bumps, or restricting traffic access.

5.0.15 Recommended A track-out control system should be used to minimize any and all material that adheres to or agglomerates on all vehicles and equipment from unpaved access connections to paved public roads.

5.0.16 Recommended Tillage operations should be combined by utilizing equipment that allows for multiple operations in a single pass, thereby reducing fugitive dust and particulate matter emissions.

5.0.17 Recommended Fugitive dust and particulate matter emissions should be reduced by leaving crop residue on the soil surface.

5.0.18 Management practices must be employed that reduce particulate matter arising from animal housing (such as swine and poultry).

6 LIVESTOCK

(this section only applies to holdings with livestock)

Principle 6.0: Livestock can have an important role to play in a Certified Regenerative holding: ruminants are more efficient at converting forage to protein than humans are, and all livestock produce manure that can be an important source of fertility.  Animals must be allowed to behave naturally and to perform natural and instinctive behaviors essential to their health and well-being.

Note: Certified Regenerative by AGW contains certain adherence requirements as detailed below to a separate animal welfare standard, called Animal Welfare Approved (AWA) by A Greener World. Please understand that although you may meet the livestock standards below initially, you will need to meet all AWA standards for all species raised within five years, including space and housing requirements. It is recommended to design and update systems for compliance with AWA standards. To learn more about this standard visit https://agreenerworld.org/certifications/animal-welfare-approved/. Where approved definitions should reflect regional oversight.   

6.0 All Livestock

6.0.1 Within three years of application, one species must be certified to Certified Animal Welfare Approved by AGW standards.

6.0.2 There must be a documented plan to attain compliance for all farm animals to AWA standards within five years of first certification.

6.0.3 Only products from Certified Animal Welfare Approved by AGW animals may be marketed as AWA.

6.0.4 Only products that are Certified Regenerative by AGW may be marketed as regenerative.

6.0.5 Livestock may only be sold as Regenerative where they have remained on the holding for the last 75% of their lives and met the Regenerative livestock standards whilst they have been on the holding.

6.0.6 Breeds and strains must be chosen with consideration of their ability to thrive in the prevailing climatic conditions of the farm, in pasture-based, free range, outdoor systems.

6.0.7 Cloned or genetically engineered animals are prohibited.

Note: This includes the use of cloned or genetically engineered breeding stock, the offspring of clones or genetically engineered animals and semen from cloned or genetically engineered animals.  

6.0.8 Feeder or Store animals sourced from Sale or Auction barns is prohibited.  The use of video auctions is permitted if the animals remain on source farm/ranch until sold and then transported to purchasing farm/ranch.

6.0.9 Feedlot(s) and other types of confinement feeding operations are prohibited.

6.0.10 All livestock must have access to pasture or range.

6.0.11 Animals and poultry must have free access to clean, fresh water at all times.

6.0.12 Animals and poultry must have a feeding plan that will guarantee a varied, well-balanced and wholesome nutritional regime appropriate for their age.

6.0.13 Feeding meat or animal by products is prohibited.

6.0.14 A list of ingredients or sample tear tags from all feed, feed blocks and mineral blocks used on farm must be made available to the AGW representative.

6.0.15 Annual testing of pasture or forage nutritional content must be carried out.

6.0.16 The Regenerative Plan must detail how the activity of the animals on the holding will not have a negative impact on the nutrient levels in the soil.

Note: Compliance to this plan will be confirmed by testing and paid for by the holding.

6.0.17 Land use for livestock must be rotated.

6.0.18 Pasture managed with ruminant livestock or poultry must not be denuded by more than 20% at any time by the activity of the animals.

6.0.19 Structures, pasture areas and the fencing that surrounds them must be designed and maintained so they do not pose a risk or inflict injury on the animals.

Note: This includes keeping pastures free of old fencing, old farm machinery and any other debris that could cause injury.

6.0.20 The house or shelter must be managed to eliminate ammonia, dampness and mold.

6.0.21 Animals must have access to fresh, clean pasture that has not become polluted with manure.

6.0.22 Abuse or maltreatment of animals or birds is prohibited.

6.0.23 Animals welfare must be maintained during transport.

6.0.23.1 All animals must have continuous access to water until the point of loading.

6.0.23.2 The transportation vehicle must be thoroughly cleaned and dried prior to loading.

6.0.23.3 Transporting downed animals is prohibited.

6.0.23.4 During transport, all animals and birds must be protected from harm and thermal stress.

6.0.23.5 Overcrowding of livestock during transport is prohibited. See applicable regional statutory requirements.

6.0.24 Poultry transport must not exceed 4 hours.

Note: A derogation may be granted if an approved slaughter plant is not available within 4 hours travel from the farm.

6.0.25 Transport of ruminants and pigs must not exceed eight hours.

Note: A derogation may be granted if an approved slaughter plant is not available within eight hours travel from the farm. Transport of breeding stock that are sourced or sold for genetic improvement is exempt from this standard.

6.0.26 The use of hot prods or electric shocks is prohibited.

6.1 Treatment All Livestock

6.1.1 Any sick or injured animals on the farm must be treated immediately to minimize pain and distress. This must include veterinary treatment if required.

6.1.1.1 Homeopathic, herbal or other non-antibiotic alternative treatments are preferred.

6.1.1.2 If alternative treatments are not suitable or not effective or if a veterinarian has recommended antibiotic treatment, this must be administered.

6.1.1.3 Withholding treatment in order to preserve an animal’s eligibility for market is prohibited.

Note: The discovery of untreated injured or ill animals may be grounds for removal from the program.

6.1.2 There must be provision of a safe place for sick or injured animals or poultry to recover, free of competition.

6.1.3 The sub-therapeutic and/or non-therapeutic use of antibiotics, or any other medicines, to control or prevent disease or promote growth, is prohibited.

6.1.4 Growth hormones or the use of any other substances promoting weight gain are prohibited.

Note: Probiotics to promote positive health are permitted.

6.1.5 Non-therapeutic use of substances to induce estrus (heat) is prohibited.

6.1.6 Records must be kept of the administration of veterinary medical products.

6.1.6.1 Date of purchase.

6.1.6.2 Name of product.

6.1.6.3 Quantity purchased.

6.1.6.4 Identity of the animals treated.

6.1.6.5 Reason why animals were treated.

6.1.6.6 Number of animals treated.

6.1.6.7 Date when treatment started and finished.

6.1.6.8 Withdrawal time.

6.1.7 Animals treated with an antibiotic must not be slaughtered to produce meat for the Certified Regenerative by AGW program before a period of time has passed that is at least twice the licensed withdrawal period of the antibiotic used.

6.1.8 Animals treated with any off-label medication must not be slaughtered to produce meat for the Certified Regenerative by AGW program until at least seven days after medication, or an alternative withdrawal as advised by a veterinarian.

6.1.8.1 Animals must not be treated with any medications prohibited for food animal use.

6.1.9 Any surgical procedure not covered by these standards must be carried out by a veterinarian.

6.1.10 Animal management must be focused on promoting health rather than treating disease.

6.1.11 A Health Plan emphasizing prevention of illness or injury must be prepared in consultation with the farm’s Qualified Expert advisor to promote positive health and limit the need for treatment. It must address:

6.1.11.1 Avoidance of physical, nutritional or environmental stress.

6.1.11.2 Lameness.

6.1.11.3 Climatic considerations.

6.1.11.4 Vaccinations and other methods to cope with prevailing disease challenges.

6.1.11.5 Biosecurity measures.

6.1.11.6 Nutrition.

6.1.11.7 Environmental impacts, including manure management and run-off.

6.1.11.8 Pasture management.

6.1.11.9 Exclusion of predators and control of rats and mice.

6.1.11.10 Euthanasia.

6.1.11.11 Mastitis.

6.1.11.12 Johne’s disease. (Cattle, Bison, Sheep, Goats)

6.1.11.13 Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis. (Goats)

6.1.12 Animals experiencing pain or suffering from which they are unlikely to recover must be promptly euthanized on the farm in a manner that renders the animal immediately insensible to pain.

Note: Please contact AGW if further information on appropriate methods of euthanasia is required.

6.2 Beef Cattle, Dairy Cattle and Bison

6.2.1 Castration using rubber bands or rings is prohibited for beef and dairy calves over seven days of age.

6.2.2 Castration using scalpel or burdizzo is prohibited for beef and dairy calves over two months of age.

Note: We understand that extensive beef operations may have difficulty with this standard. Such operations should contact AGW for guidance.

6.2.3 Castration of male bison is prohibited.

6.2.4 Tail docking of cattle and bison is prohibited.

6.2.5 Dehorning of cattle and bison is prohibited. Horns may be tipped as long as the living tissue inside the horn is not being cut.

6.2.6 Spaying of heifers is prohibited.

6.2.7 Disbudding of bison is prohibited.

6.2.8 Cattle less than 2 months or 60 days (whichever is longer) may be disbudded.

6.2.9 Hot iron cauterization may be used for disbudding it must be preceded and followed by administration of appropriate anesthetic and analgesia.

Note: Derogation to this standard will only be granted if the farmer can show that they cannot legally obtain local anesthetics and analgesics.

6.2.10 Caustic paste may be used to disbud calves that are no older than 7 days.

Note: Best practice recommendations for use of caustic paste are as follows. Great care needs to be taken in applying the paste: hair around the horn bud should be clipped, paste should only be applied to the horn bud and rubbed in well, and petroleum jelly should be applied in a ring around the horn bud to prevent the paste running. It is not recommended to carry out this procedure in wet conditions.

6.2.11 Recommended Choosing polled breeds, which avoids the need to disbud animals, is recommended.

6.2.12 If removal of supernumerary teats on dairy females is to be done the procedure must be carried out by a competent person using an effective local anesthetic before the calves are five weeks old.

6.2.13 Where identification is required it must not cause harm to the animal.

6.2.13.1 Ear tagging and tattooing and freeze branding are permitted methods of identification.

6.2.13.2 Ear-marking by cutting/notching the ears of cattle is permitted and must be carried out with an ear notching tool. Cutting/ notching with a knife is prohibited.

6.2.13.3 Ear marking by cutting/notching the ears of bison is prohibited.

6.2.14 Recommended The preferred method for permanent identification is Sub-Cutaneous Radio Frequency Identification.

6.2.15 Recommended The preferred method of temporary identification is non-toxic paints or dyes.

6.2.16 Marking cattle by cutting/ notching the dewlap is prohibited.

6.2.17 Hot branding is prohibited.

Note: Flank or rump branding may be carried out when required by state law or by financial institutions, breed societies or when there is a risk of theft or unintentional mixing with other herds. If both hot iron and freeze branding are permitted, freeze branding must be used when practical. Please contact AGW to discuss any requirement to brand.

6.2.18 Animals must be maintained at body condition score 4 or above on a 1-9 scale or body condition score 2 or above on a 1-5 scale.

6.2.19 Breeding animals must not exceed body condition score 7 on a 1-9 scale or body condition score 4 on a 1-5 scale.

6.2.20 Heifers must not calve before the age of two years.

Note: Young females may reach puberty before the optimal age of first service. Males must be managed carefully to ensure females are not accidentally served too young.

6.2.21 Calves must be provided with colostrum within the first six hours of birth.

6.2.22 Artificially reared calves must be fed milk or milk replacer at least twice a day.

6.2.23 Weaning beef and bison calves at less than six months of age is prohibited unless in exceptional circumstances when the health and welfare of calf or mother would be compromised

6.2.24 Artificially reared dairy calves and beef and bison calves separated for health or welfare reasons must not be weaned from milk before they are six weeks of age.

6.2.25 To ensure proper rumen function, non-lactating cattle must be provided with at least 70 percent long fiber roughage/forage in their diet on a daily dry matter basis from weaning onwards.

6.2.26 The minimum requirement for roughage for lactating dairy cows is 60 percent long fiber roughage/forage on a daily dry matter basis.

6.2.27 Tie stalls must only be used for milking and/or feeding immediately pre- or post- milking.

6.2.28 In housing, bedding must be available to cattle at all times.

6.3 Sheep, Dairy Sheep, Goats, Dairy Goats

6.3.1 Laparoscopic or surgical artificial insemination is prohibited.

Note: Other forms of artificial insemination are permitted.

6.3.2 Immunocastration and other forms of chemical (synthetic or natural) castration or testosterone production limiting methods are prohibited.

6.3.3 It is prohibited to castrate lambs that are more than seven days old.

Note: Lambs may be castrated using rubber rings, scalpel or emasculator (burdizzo).

6.3.4 Tail docking is prohibited.

Note: Shepherds who meet all other AGW protocols but do not meet the standard on tail docking are invited to contact AGW to discuss a timetable to come into full compliance.

6.3.5 Dehorning of sheep and goats is prohibited. Horns may be tipped as long as the living tissue inside the horn is not being cut.

6.3.6 Disbudding of sheep is prohibited.

6.3.7 Kids 10 days or less may be disbudded.

6.3.8 If hot iron cauterization is used for disbudding kids, it must be preceded and followed by administration of appropriate anesthetic and analgesia.

Note: Derogation to this standard will only be granted if the farmer can show that they cannot legally obtain local anesthetics and analgesics.

6.3.9 Recommended Caustic paste disbudding should not be used for kids.

Note: Best practice recommendations for use of caustic paste are as follows. Great care needs to be taken in applying the paste: hair around the horn bud should be clipped, paste should only be applied to the horn bud and rubbed in well, and petroleum jelly should be applied in a ring around the horn bud to prevent the paste running. It is not recommended to carry out this procedure in wet conditions.

6.3.10 Recommended Choosing polled breeds, which avoids the need to disbud animals, is recommended.

6.3.11 Mulesing of sheep is prohibited.

6.3.12 De-wattling of goats is prohibited.

6.3.13 De-scenting bucks is prohibited.

6.3.14 Where identification is required it must not cause harm to the animal.

6.3.14.1 Recommended The preferred method for permanent identification is Sub-Cutaneous Radio Frequency Identification.

6.3.14.2  Recommended The preferred method of temporary identification is non-toxic paints or dyes.

6.3.14.3 Ear tagging and tattooing are permitted methods of identification.

6.3.15 Ear marking by cutting/notching the ears of sheep is prohibited.

6.3.16 Where extenuating circumstances requires shearing in colder weather, bedding and shelter must be provided for at least seven days.

6.3.17 Use of chemicals that would cause the cessation of wool growth is prohibited.

6.3.18 To ensure proper rumen function, non-lactating sheep and goats must be provided with at least 70 percent long fiber roughage/forage in their diet on a daily dry matter basis from weaning onwards.

6.3.19 The minimum requirement for roughage for lactating dairy sheep and goats is 60 percent long fiber roughage/forage on a daily dry matter basis.

6.3.20 Animals must be maintained at body condition score 2 or above on a 1-5 scale.

6.3.21 Breeding animals must not exceed body condition score 4 on a 1-5 scale.

6.3.22 Ewes and does must not lamb or kid before the age of 13 months.

Note: In a situation where lambing or kidding takes place over a period of time the flock or herd average figure will be assessed. Young females may reach puberty before the optimal age of first service. Males must be managed carefully to ensure females are not accidentally served too young.

6.3.23 Lambs and kids must be provided with colostrum within the first six hours of birth.

6.3.24 Artificially reared lambs/kids must be fed milk or milk replacer at least twice a day.

6.3.25 Artificially reared dairy lambs/kids and lambs/kids separated for health or welfare reasons must not be weaned from milk before they are six weeks of age.

6.3.26 Weaning lambs or kids in a meat sheep/goat herd at less than three months of age is prohibited unless in exceptional circumstances when the health and welfare of lamb/kid or mother would be compromised.

6.3.27 If removal of supernumerary teats on dairy females is to be done the procedure must be carried out by a competent person using an effective local anesthetic before the kids/lambs are five weeks old.

6.3.28 In climatic regions where their thermal comfort may be negatively impacted, sheep and goats must have continuous access as required to housing or shelter that protects them from weather extremes, including high winds, sleet and heavy snows, and sun.

6.3.29 Goats must have shelter from the rain.

6.3.30 In housing, bedding must be available to sheep and goats at all times.

6.4 Pigs

6.4.1 It is prohibited to castrate piglets that are more than seven days old.

Note: Where a risk to the piglets’ health or welfare can be demonstrated this period can be extended to 14 days.

6.4.2 Immunocastration and other forms of chemical (synthetic or natural) castration or testosterone production limiting methods are prohibited.

Note: AGW is reviewing the evidence relating to immunocastration in pigs. Any farm wishing to use this method of castration must first contact AGW.  

6.4.3 Tail docking is prohibited.

6.4.4 Clipping, grinding or filing of the needle teeth of piglets is prohibited.

6.4.5 Removal of boar’s tusks is prohibited.

Note: Trimming the tusks on boars as needed may be done with a surgical wire by a trained individual.

6.4.6 Nose ringing of pigs is prohibited.

Note: Derogation may be granted for one septum nose ring for breeding sows only if it can be demonstrated that the activity of the sow would otherwise damage soil structure, cause environmental pollution, or compromise the welfare of her litter.

6.4.7 Where identification is required it must not cause harm to the animal.

6.4.7.1 Recommended The preferred method for permanent identification is Sub-Cutaneous Radio Frequency Identification.

6.4.7.2 Recommended The preferred method of temporary identification is non-toxic paints or dyes.

6.4.7.3 Ear tagging and tattooing are permitted methods of identification.

6.4.8 Ear-marking by cutting/notching the ears of pigs must be carried out with an ear notching tool. Cutting/notching with a knife is prohibited.

6.4.9 Animals must be maintained at body condition score 2 or above on a 1-5 scale.

6.4.10 Breeding animals must not exceed body condition score 4 on a 1-5 scale.

6.4.11 Gilts must not farrow before the age of 10 months.

Note: Young females may reach puberty before the optimal age of first service. Males must be managed carefully to ensure females are not accidentally served too young.

6.4.12 Farrowing systems must be arranged and managed in such a way to minimize mortality.

6.4.13 Sows about to farrow must be provided with an individual arc, hut or pen for farrowing and nursing.

6.4.14 Prior to farrowing arcs, huts or pens must be amply bedded with fresh, dry bedding that the sow can manipulate.

Note: Particular care should be taken when using a heat lamp for piglets over bedding because of the risk of fire.

6.4.15 Sows must not be placed into individual pens for farrowing for more than two weeks prior to the expected farrowing date.

6.4.16 Sows must not be confined within individual huts for more than 24 hours prior to the expected farrowing date.

6.4.17 After sows have farrowed they must not be confined within individual huts.

6.4.18 Piglets must be able to leave the arc or hut after 10 days of age.

6.4.19: If an indoor farrowing pen is used it must be a minimum of 64 sq. ft. (6 sq. meters). If the sow and piglets do not have immediate access to pasture after 10 days of age, an additional 48 sq. ft. (3 sq. meters) must be available for three weeks. After three weeks if climate permits the sows and piglets must have access to pasture. If farrowing huts are used on pasture, they must have 42 sq. ft (4 sq. meters) of floor space and piglets can only be confined to the hut for a maximum of 10 days.

Note: Farrowing huts constructed or purchased following farm approval by AGW must meet the standard above. Smaller huts that were purchased or constructed before farm approval may be acceptable.

6.4.20 Excess piglets must not be removed for fostering until they have had colostrum.

6.4.21 Pigs must be fostered onto sows within 48 hours of the foster sow giving birth.

6.4.22 Piglets must be at least six weeks of age at weaning.

6.4.23 In exceptional circumstances when the health and welfare of the piglet or the mother would otherwise be compromised, piglets may be weaned before six weeks of age. A record must be kept of each instance and the reasons for this early weaning.

6.4.24 Continuous ranging and foraging area access is required for all pigs from the age of 21 days.

6.4.25 Pigs must have access to growing green vegetation on the range whenever conditions allow.

6.5 Poultry (Chickens, Turkeys, Ducks, Geese)

6.5.1 All mutilations or physical alterations of poultry are prohibited. These include:

6.5.1.1 De-beaking (Beak Clipping, Tipping and Trimming).

6.5.1.2 De-clawing.

6.5.1.3 De-spurring.

6.5.1.4 De-toeing and toe trimming.

6.5.1.5 Hole Punching.

6.5.1.6 Pinioning.

6.5.1.7 Notching.

6.5.1.8 Wattle Trimming.

6.5.1.9 Comb Trimming.

6.5.1.10 De-snooding.

6.5.1.11 Trimming feathers of poultry is permitted. Skin or flesh must not be cut.

6.5.1.12 Castration (caponizing) of poultry is prohibited.

6.5.2 If negative behaviors affecting the welfare of birds in the flock are seen or reported, management and/or breed changes must be made to improve welfare.

Note: AGW may require the farmer to reduce the flock or colony size within the affected flock or any future flocks in order to remain in the program. Flock size is a factor that has been shown to affect the occurrence of negative behaviors such as feather pecking, cannibalism and others.

6.5.3 Hens must be protected from excessive injury during treading.

6.5.4 All hens must have access to dust baths.

6.5.5 Poultry systems must be arranged and managed in such a way to minimize mortality.

6.5.6 Birds must be allowed to molt naturally. Forced molting is prohibited.

6.5.7 Throwing young birds or mechanical moving of young birds from delivery containers is prohibited.

6.5.8 Young birds must be placed from a height of 12 in (30.48 cm) or less.

6.5.9 Litter must be provided from placement of young birds.

6.5.10 Young birds must be placed within 36 hours of the first egg hatching.

6.5.11 Recommended Young birds should have access to forage from 24 hours after placement.

6.5.12 Young birds must have access to forage by seven days of age.

6.5.13 When averaged over their entire lives, the rate of growth of meat chickens allowed to grow naturally on an optimum ration must not exceed 0.088 lbs (40 g) per day.

6.5.14 When averaged over their entire lives, the rate of growth of meat turkeys allowed to grow naturally on an optimum ration must not exceed 0.15 lbs (68.0 g) for females, and 0.19 lbs (86.2 g) for males, per day.

6.5.15 When averaged over their entire lives, the rate of growth of meat ducks allowed to grow naturally on an optimum ration must not exceed 0.132 lbs. (60 g) per day.

6.5.16 When averaged over their entire lives, the rate of growth of meat geese allowed to grow naturally on an optimum ration must not exceed 0.132 lbs. (60 g) per day.

6.5.17 Fish and aquatic products fed to poultry must come from sustainable sources.

Note: Feeding dairy products or by-products is permitted. By-products of aquatic species caught or farmed for human consumption and/or those that come from fisheries with a valid certificate of sustainability (e.g. from MSC) may be classed as sustainable. 

6.5.18 Poultry must have constant access to food during daylight hours.

6.5.19 Birds must always have access to insoluble grit. Birds must be able to pass the grit into the gizzard.

Note: Grit may be obtained from the environment or provided as a supplement. If provided as a supplement it can be removed 48 hours prior to slaughter.

6.5.20 In climatic conditions that do not pose a risk to bird welfare continuous daytime ranging and foraging area access is required for all birds from the age of four weeks onwards.

Note: AGW recommends that all birds have access to the outdoor ranging and foraging area from as early on in life as possible. This could be from two to three days old onwards if conditions allow.

6.5.21 Birds must have space to fly, run and stretch their wings in pens on ranging and foraging areas.

6.5.22 A fully enclosed pen on ranging and foraging areas for hens must be at least 4 ft (1.2m) high.

6.5.23 If pens on ranging and foraging areas are moved in the lifetime of the flock protocols must be in place to ensure no harm comes to birds during the move.

6.5.24 All geese and ducks must have access to water for behavioral needs.

Note: Different species have different behavioral needs. All geese and ducks must have access to water such that they can dip their heads in water and spread water over their feathers. Geese and Mallard ducks additionally require water they can swim in, whereas Muscovy ducks do not. Goslings and Ducklings are included in the requirement above but they must be protected from the risk of drowning. This may necessitate excluding them from large bodies of water and/or deep water.

6.5.25 Water for swimming needs must be deep enough for birds to fully invert their bodies in the water and swim without their feet touching the bottom.

6.5.26 The thermal comfort of poultry must be protected by provision of housing or shelter with natural or mechanical temperature and humidity control as required. The needs of all ages and stages of production and local climatic extremes must be taken into account when planning housing or shelter.

Note: If the temperature drops below 55F (13C) for more than 7 days in a row, natural shelter is not sufficient to protect bird thermal comfort and man-made houses or shelters must be provided.

6.5.27 If birds are excluded from daytime access to ranging and foraging areas, they must be provided with vegetative material so that they can engage in foraging behavior.

6.5.28 Shelters and housing must be well ventilated and allow fresh air to enter.

6.5.29 Shelters and housing must allow natural light to enter.

6.5.30 Birds must not be subjected to dim and/or continuous lighting or kept in permanent darkness.

6.5.31 In the daytime, the birds must always be able to see each other, their food and water sources, as well as their surroundings clearly.

6.5.32 Inspection of birds must be possible at any time day or night.

6.5.33 Use of artificial light must not extend the maximum day-length beyond 16 hours.

6.5.34 When birds are shut into housing or shelter any artificial light must be distributed evenly.

6.5.35 Poultry housing must be kept at an average of at least 20 lux in daylight hours.

6.5.36 Wire mesh flooring must not damage the birds’ feet.

6.5.37 When poultry are excluded from outdoor, vegetated ranging and foraging areas during daylight hours they must continue to have access to a solid floored foraging area.

Note for poultry: Existing mesh or slatted flooring areas within the house may be covered to create the equivalent of a solid surface, or birds may be given access to a solid floored foraging area outside the house – for example a winter garden or barn – when conditions do not allow them to be outside on a vegetated ranging and foraging area.

6.5.38 Houses for poultry must be at least 4 ft (1.2m) high.

Note: This standard does not apply when birds always have free access in and out of the house.

6.5.39 Once in lay, chicken breeder flocks and laying hens must have access to 7 in (18cm) aerial perch per bird.

6.5.40 Perches for chicken breeder and layers, turkeys breeders and layers, Muscovy duck breeders and layers must be at least 12” (30cm) off the floor; 18” (45cm) apart vertically in ladder perches; 12” (30cm) apart vertically in A frame or diagonal perches; 12” (30cm) apart horizontally and at least 8” (20cm) from a wall.

6.5.41 Laying chicken hens and laying ducks must have at least one individual nest box for every five birds.

6.5.42 Where communal nests are used there must be at least 20 sq. inches (129cm2) per chicken laying hen or laying duck.

6.5.43 Once in lay, turkey breeder flocks and laying turkey hens must have access to 15.7 in (40cm) aerial perch per bird.

6.5.44 Laying turkeys and laying geese must have at least one nest box for every four birds.

6.5.45 Once in lay, Muscovy ducks (breeder flocks and laying ducks) must have access to perches. The aerial perch space must provide a minimum of 15.7 in (40cm) per bird.

6.5.46 All poultry nest boxes must be dry with friable and manipulable nesting material.

6.5.47 Planned catching (for example to take birds to slaughter) must be carried out in dusk or darkness.

Note: Individual birds may be caught in daylight for required treatments or inspections.

6.5.48 All chicken must be caught and carried round the body or by both legs. Single leg catching of chickens is prohibited.

6.5.49 Turkeys must always be carried individually with two hands and lifted with support to the breast and with the head upward.

Note: Please contact AGW if further information on appropriate methods of catching and handling is required.

6.5.50 Ducks and geese must always be carried individually with two hands and lifted with support to the breast and with the head upward.

6.5.50.1 Ducks and geese must not be picked up by their legs or feet.

Note: Please contact AGW if further information on appropriate methods of catching and handling is required.

6.6 Slaughter

6.6.1 Meat sold under the Certified Regenerative label or logo must come from animals that have been slaughtered at an AGW-recommended slaughter facility.

6.6.2 Meat sold under the Certified Regenerative label must come from animals that have been stunned before slaughter.

7 LAND USE AND CROPPING

Principle 7.0: Any land use or cropping systems in a Certified Regenerative holding must balance the farmed ecosystem with natural systems. Stewards should apply high standards of conservation management to enhance landscape features, habitats and wild plant and wild animal species, while linking habitats and employing creative conservation projects.

7.0.1 The foundation of the fertility system must be generated via activities such as the integration of livestock, compost and green manure, nutrient catch crops, use of deep-rooted perennials (“living roots”) and careful crop rotation.

7.0.2 The application of nutrients must be in compliance with the Regenerative Plan; any over or under application must be noted and a reason given.

7.0.3 Actual allowed input usage must be documented in the Regenerative Plan and be reviewed annually.

7.0.4 Nutrients may be brought onto the holding, provided their use is justified as part of the Regenerative Plan.

7.0.5 Any agricultural inputs, including those for weed, disease or pest control, must be identified in the plan, agreed in advance and time limited.  For the list of permitted Certified Regenerative inputs, please see Annex E.

7.0.6 Diversity in crop rotation is required.

7.0.7 Non-chemical controls must be used as the first practice to reduce weeds.

7.0.8 Chemical control must only be used when no other method is effective and when the Regenerative Plan demonstrates that non-target species will be protected.

7.0.9 Workers must be trained and competent to safely handle and apply permitted inputs.

7.0.10 Agrochemicals must be stored or transported with their complete label and safety information, including safe/careful transport procedures.

7.0.11 Agrochemical storage must be safe, locked, clearly indicated, and not located in areas subject to flooding or ecologically sensitive areas.

7.0.12 Records of stock inventory of agrochemicals must be kept, including date, quantity, type and intended use.

7.0.13 Where an agrochemical is used, buffer zones must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan in order to protect watercourses, boundaries and neighboring crops.

7.0.14 It is prohibited to cultivate or plant genetically engineered/genetically modified plants or crops.

8 BIODIVERSITY

Principle 8.0: Biodiversity is an essential indicator of a successful Certified Regenerative farming system where wildlife habitats are integral parts of the holding. These include areas such as banks, hedges, ponds, species-rich pastures, wetland areas and scrubland.

8.0.1 It is prohibited to knowingly use products containing Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) or derivatives of GMOs.

Note: For the purposes of this program, CRISPR and other form of gene editing are considered genetically engineered/modified technology, or GMOs.

8.0.2 Threatened or endangered species of flora or fauna and their habitats must be protected.

8.0.3 Method(s) of protection must be outlined in the Regenerative Plan.

8.0.4 It is prohibited to destroy or clear primary or old growth secondary forests.

Note: Any holding that has made land cultivatable or available for grazing up to 10 years before certification can only be accepted for Certified Regenerative certification if considerable and adapted efforts are made to repair the damages and impacts caused, and to avoid them occurring again.

8.0.5 Actions to measure and improve the diversity of habitats and species on the holding must be taken and detailed within the Regenerative Plan.

Note: The list and actions to measure habitats and species on the holding will be used as a benchmark in order to demonstrate the improvement in habitat and species over the time of the Regenerative Plan.

8.0.6 Deliberate introduction of invasive species to wild areas is prohibited.

Note: This section does not apply to cultivated gardens and landscapes where control of the species can be demonstrably managed.

8.0.7 If invasive species pose a threat to wild areas, activities to restore those areas must be taken.

8.0.8 Traditional use rights and traditional knowledge must be respected in the commercial use of biodiversity. If disputes over resource use exist, these must be settled with Prior Informed Consent and under Mutually Agreed Terms.

See Guidance Document on Access and Benefit Sharing for more information on use of traditional knowledge.

8.0.9 In the case of current or intended use of genetic resources derived from biodiversity, the steward must make a demonstrable good faith attempt to comply with the Nagoya Protocol at the minimum.

8.0.9.1 In countries where the Nagoya Protocol has been translated into national legislation, the steward must observe the provisions of the respective legislation.

8.0.10 Hunting must be detailed in the Regenerative Plan and must meet the following:

8.0.10.1 Part of a recognized cultural requirement.

8.0.10.2 Connections to the land through birth or belief hunting according to tradition.

8.0.10.3 Is carried out as part of a subsistence plan.

8.0.10.4 The meat produced is consumed by the hunter or their family.

8.0.10.5 Must be of a method that avoids suffering and results in instantaneous death.

8.0.10.6 Where culling is required as part of a sustainable wildlife management practice.

8.1 Wild Harvesting (this section only applies to holdings with wild collection activities)

Wild harvest represents a major income source for people worldwide. Any wild harvesting in the Certified Regenerative holding must be carried out in such a manner as to maintain wild plant resources and prevent negative impacts on these resources, their habitats and ecosystems.

8.1.1 The conservation status of the target species and population must be assessed and reviewed annually.

8.1.2 Any rare, threatened, and endangered species and habitats that may be affected by collection and management of the target species must be identified in the Regenerative Plan and protected.

8.1.3 Target species must be identified and mapped. Collection practices and harvest levels must ensure the outcome of the wild harvesting will not preclude the natural regeneration of the population.

See Guidance Document on Wild Harvest Population Monitoring.

8.1.4 The rate of target resource collection must not exceed the target species’ ability to regenerate over the long term, and must be assessed and planned for in the Regenerative Plan.

See Guidance Document on Good Collection Practices.

8.1.5 Management activities affecting or supporting wild collection of target species must not adversely affect ecosystem diversity, processes and functions.

8.1.6 Management of forest and woodland must be as outlined in the Regenerative Plan.

8.1.6.1 The clear cutting of forests is prohibited, unless previously approved in the Regenerative Plan, with a clear plan for forest regeneration.

8.1.7  Records must be kept to demonstrate that collectors and managers must have a clear and recognized right and authority to use and manage the target resources.

8.2  Predators and Rodents

8.2.1 All livestock must be protected from predators.

8.2.2 If livestock guardian dogs are used the management of livestock, they must meet the A Greener World guidelines for guardian or herding canine management.

8.2.3 If other guardian animals are used they must be suitable for guardian duties.

8.2.4 Guardian animals must be chosen with consideration of their ability to thrive in the prevailing climatic conditions of the farm, in pasture-based, free range, outdoor systems.

8.2.5 In the event that exclusion is unsuccessful and predation remains an issue, live trapping may be used.

8.2.6 Live traps must be checked twice daily.

8.2.7 All other forms of traps are prohibited.

8.2.8 All snares and leghold traps are prohibited.

8.2.9 The use of poisons against predators is prohibited.

8.2.10 If live trapping is not possible or is not successful then as a last resort lethal control of specific animals may be carried out when these are causing an immediate threat to farm livestock.

8.2.11 If there is a continuous threat from predators that cannot be managed by live trapping advice must be sought from A Greener World regarding a control program.

8.2.12 Lethal control/euthanasia of predators must result in instantaneous irreversible unconsciousness and death.

8.2.13 If a predatory animal has been euthanized to protect the livestock on the farm, there must be records kept of the species in question, number of animals, and euthanasia method.

8.3 Control of Rats and Mice

8.3.1 Glue boards for the control of rats and mice are prohibited.

8.3.2 Licensed rodenticides placed such that non-target species have no access to them may be used for the control of rats or mice.

8.3.3 Lethal control/euthanasia of live trapped rodents must result in instantaneous irreversible unconsciousness and death.

9 BUILDINGS

(this section only applies to holdings with buildings)

Principle 9.0: Human-constructed buildings become part of the landscape and contribute to the environment; they must be included in the Certified Regenerative Plan and managed for resource efficiency.

9.0.1 Recommended Existing buildings should be maintained, restored or repurposed.

9.0.2 Recommended Any maintenance, restoration or repurposing should be in keeping with the surrounding environment.

9.0.3 Buildings of historical significance and sites of archeological importance must be protected or maintained.

9.0.4 New buildings must not have negative impacts on the surrounding environment.

9.0.5 Any building or structure on the holding built or to be built must be designed and maintained to avoid contamination of any known watercourses, wells or lakes.

9.0.6 Recommended New buildings should provide roosts or nests for bats and birds, if the holding is in their native range.

9.0.7 If any construction, operation, or material used on the holding impacts flora or fauna, it must be outlined and assessed (with an impact assessment) in the Regenerative Plan.

9.0.8 New buildings/construction must be designed with energy use and sustainable practices at the core using the guidelines below.

9.0.9 Recommended Holdings should estimate energy and water usage and set goals in their Regenerative Plan for increasing efficiency and reducing costs.

9.0.10 Recommended Building infrastructure should be constructed using sustainable architecture techniques which minimize the negative impact of buildings.

9.0.11 Recommended Holdings should transition to renewable energy over time.

9.0.12 Low VOC paints or materials must be used.

Note: Any building or construction must be in compliance with local laws and ordinance.

9.0.13 Certified Regenerative holdings must implement a recycling program and work towards achieving goals to reduce waste in the Regenerative Plan.

Note: Repurposing older buildings or farm materials would be considered recycling.

9.0.14 As part of the planning process, consideration must be given to natural threats. The assessment must cover risks by:

9.0.14.1 Fire.

9.0.14.2 Flood.

9.0.14.3 Geological acts and where they are assessed.

9.0.14.4 Human activity.

9.0.15 Recommended Buildings should be built to withstand natural threats.

9.0.16 Buildings must have effective systems for reducing the impact of runoff and erosion potential.

9.0.17 Recommended Rainwater should be collected for irrigation and re-use.

10 HUMAN

Principle 10.0: Humans are an integral part of farming an­­d sustainability: Certified Regenerative holdings must be managed in a socially responsible way. 

10.0.1 At a minimum, the holding must demonstrate that the workers have freedom to associate, to organize and bargain collectively.

10.0.2 A mechanism must be in place for workers to express Grievances without negative consequences.

10.0.2.1 Any expressed grievances or suggestions for management must be acknowledged and answered in a transparent manner.

10.0.3 There must be no forced or involuntary labor.

10.0.4 Children (under 15 years) must not be employed as workers.

10.0.5 Young workers (between 15-18 years of age) must not engage in work that interferes with their education or in work that is hazardous to their health.

10.0.6 Children on the holding (including resident farm families) must be protected from hazards on the holding.

Note: Working with family members is a recognized method for children to grasp agriculture at an early age. This standard is not meant to exclude that learning, but to exclude the abuse of child labor. Children and young people may be engaged in the holding as part of a life learning experience.

10.0.7 Discrimination of workers based on race, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or other personal characteristics is prohibited.

10.0.8 Disciplinary measures towards workers must be fair. The measures must ensure that each of the following requirements are met:

10.0.8.1 Disciplinary measures must be applied consistently to all employees with no preferential treatment.

10.0.8.2 Employees must be aware of behavior that would result in disciplinary measures.

10.0.8.3 The employer procedure for disciplinary action must include an investigation of the matter, selecting an appropriate measure and imposing that measure.

10.0.8.4 Fair measures must include notification of employee with either verbal, written notice, suspension, dismissal.

10.0.8.5 Consideration of aggravating and mitigating factors.

10.0.8.6 Meeting with the employee to obtain their version of the facts.

10.0.8.7 Measures taken must be in balance with the issue addressed.

10.0.8.8 Recognized disciplinary measures towards workers must not violate human rights.

Note: Refer to the UN Universal Declaration on Human Rights.

10.0.9 Disciplinary measures must be documented.

10.1 Safety and hygiene

10.1.1 A safe and hygienic working environment must be provided to workers through health and safety management. Measures that must be taken into account include but are not limited to the following:

10.1.1.1 A risk assessment of hazards to the health and safety of visitors and workers must be performed annually.

10.1.1.2 Serviced and functioning task-specific Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) must be immediately available for use by workers.

10.1.1.3 Workers must be required to use their PPE if appropriate to the task.

10.1.1.4 Access to potable drinking water must be provided free of charge during the hours of engagement.

10.1.1.5 Fire protection systems and emergency procedures must be in place and maintained.

10.1.1.6 Certificates of maintenance records must be available.

10.1.1.7 Workers who access a building must be trained on emergency procedures in case of a fire or other emergency.

10.1.1.8 First aid equipment must be readily available and maintained.

10.1.1.9 Workers must have easy access to restrooms and personal hygiene facilities.

10.1.1.10 Workers must be provided protection from extreme thermal stress.  Possibilities include gloves, rescheduling tasks to avoid extreme environmental conditions, providing hats and shade.

10.1.2 When housing is provided to workers as part of their employment, it must be both:

10.1.2.1 Adequate, clean and safe, according to local standards.

10.1.2.2 At reasonable costs (in line with local rents).

10.2 Wages and Benefits

10.2.1 Holdings must demonstrate their workers are paid a living wage.

Note: Where a living wage is not determined locally, please contact A Greener World.

10.2.2 Workers must have access to banking and financial planning, including retirement planning.

10.2.3 Recommended Holdings should provide health insurance for regular workers.

10.2.4 Where health insurance is not provided, holdings must contribute towards medical care as a minimum.

10.2.5 Holdings must provide coverage for work-related disability if not covered under statutory regulations.

10.2.6 Recommended Support should be given to families to access medical, spiritual and educational resources.

10.2.7 Records must be kept that demonstrate:

10.2.7.1 The worker received full payment.

10.2.7.2 The hours were recorded and agreed by the worker.

10.2.7.3 That time off and rest periods were observed.

10.2.8 Recommended Basic coverage for retirement should be made available for regular workers (either by paying contributions to a private or government fund).

10.2.8.1 Recommended If the worker has refused this contribution, record should be kept of their decision.

10.2.9 Recommended Garden and/or livestock product shares should be given to workers.

10.2.10 The holding’s activities must not have negative impact on local/indigenous communities.

10.2.11 Weekly working hours must be in line with national labor legislation or any collective bargaining agreement.

10.2.12 Usual weekly working hours may only exceed 48 hours if agreed by the worker, who must be allowed to deny and retract their acceptance at reasonably short notice without fear of discrimination.

Note: Usual weekly working hours may exceed 48 hours for times of seasonal or peak production, to a maximum of 72 hours. Where there is a risk to the health and safety of workers through tiredness or fatigue, this maximum must be reduced.

10.2.13 Overtime must be voluntary.

10.2.14 One rest day in every seven-day period must be agreed and guaranteed.

Note: If previously agreed in writing, this can be averaged over a 14-day cycle.

10.2.15 Rest breaks carried out during the day, taking into account the location climate and type of work, must be agreed in writing and guaranteed.

10.2.16 When workers are recruited, there must be prior written agreement that specifies the terms of employment in a manner understandable to the worker. Points addressed in such an agreement must include:

10.2.16.1 The duration of the employment.

10.2.16.2 Quality and cost of housing to be provided.

10.2.16.3 Food costs.

10.2.16.4 Trip expenses and safety.

10.2.16.5 Implication of breach of contract by either party.

10.2.17 Recommended Holdings should provide job opportunities for people from local areas.

10.2.18 Recommended Holdings should provide employment to marginalized groups.

10.2.19 Recommended Holdings should support the local community through their engagement in social, cultural, educational or environmental projects.

Note: Possibilities include support of school or local health services, or scholarship programs, training of local stewards in regenerative agriculture, composting programs, renewable energy programs.

11 FINANCIAL

Principle 11.0: In order for a holding to be regenerative, it must be economically sustainable. Certified Regenerative holdings must have a financial plan that considers the long-term financial stability and viability of the holding and its operation.

11.0.1 Recommended According to the financial planning portion of their Regenerative Plan, holdings should implement, monitor and control their finances on a regular basis.

11.0.2 Recommended Holdings should maintain insurance coverage where not provided for in a statutory environment:

11.0.2.1 Disability.

11.0.2.2 Health.

11.0.2.3 Property.

11.0.2.4 Farm liability.

11.0.3 Recommended Holdings should plan for and invest in an emergency fund.

11.0.4 Recommended Holdings should review debts and strategize how they will reduce debt over time.

11.0.5 Recommended Holdings should engage in only responsible lending and borrowing practices.

11.0.6 Recommended Holdings should plan for a smooth transition or retirement plan.

ANNEXES

Annex A Qualified Experts for Regenerative Plan Development

Annex B Assessment, Monitoring & Testing Methods

Annex C Worksheets Template (available for download here or by request)

Annex D List of Prohibited Inputs

Annex E List of Allowed Inputs

Annex F Recognition/Equivalencies with other Certifications

GUIDANCE DOCUMENTS

Guidance Document on Wild Harvest Population Monitoring

Guidance Document on Good Collection Practices

Guidance Document on Access and Benefit Sharing

Certified Regenerative Policy Manual

Certified Regenerative by AGW logo

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