skip to Main Content

Grassfed’s Role In A Greener World: AGW’s Response to the University of Oxford study, Grazed and Confused?

Grazed and Confused?—the new report from the University of Oxford’s Food Climate Research Network—represents an important step forward in advancing our scientific knowledge on how we might feed ourselves sustainably.

Written by a number of eminent scientists involved in exploring sustainable food production, the report seeks to address a specific—but vital—question in the sustainable food debate: What is the role of grazing ruminants in contributing to or mitigating climate change?

It is therefore extremely disappointing to see this important report being widely misrepresented in the media and misused by those who are calling for an end to food animal production, or to discredit grassfed or pasture-based livestock operations in favor of other species or production models.

Read More

Southwest Grass-Fed Conference

The Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance, with the support of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, is hosting this daylong conference for livestock producers, local food activists, and all others interested in the rapidly growing market for grass-fed/locally sourced livestock products and the unique benefits and challenges faced in the Southwest.
Read More

Southwest Grass-Fed Conference

The Southwest Grassfed Livestock Alliance, with the support of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, is hosting this daylong conference for livestock producers, local food activists, and all others interested in the rapidly growing market for grass-fed/locally sourced livestock products and the unique benefits and challenges faced in the Southwest.
Read More

Third-Party Grassfed Certification More Important Than Ever

On January 11, the Agriculture Marketing Service (AMS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced it had withdrawn its Grassfed Standard used in livestock and meat marketing due to lack of a clear congressional mandate to maintain it.

At A Greener World, we have long highlighted the major deficiencies in the USDA grassfed label claim (see The Grassfed Primer, page 5). For example, under this standard farmers could confine cattle on dirt feedlots for long periods outside the grass growing season, or use growth hormones and subtherapeutic antibiotics, and still market their beef under the USDA grassfed label claim–just as long as they fed the animals ‘cut grass or forage.’ Yet despite these clear limitations, we recognize the USDA grassfed standard at least provided a minimum baseline in the market.

We therefore believe the removal of the USDA grassfed standard will lead to significant confusion in the marketplace about grassfed label claims, and could allow unscrupulous operations to market meat or dairy products as “grassfed” when their production methods do not even meet the previous low requirements of the USDA standards, potentially eroding consumer trust in all grassfed label claims.

Read More
This website uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More
Back To Top
×Close search
Search